whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because reactions to my females body related art has involved emails informing me that I am “inflicting self harm to my intellect” and “debasing my body.”
Do you see yourself reflected in the media you consume? Parallel Magazine is all about providing an alternative to the airbrushing and the shaming, the heteronormativity and the gender binary we’re dealt as the only way. Life through a feminist lens, by women for women. Support our start-up feminist magazine at 
http://bit.ly/parallelmag.
Women’s Magazines are several million pound industry in the UK. With over 200 titles to choose from, women buy on average almost 7 million magazines every month, and 38% of women in the UK trust magazines. And yet magazines that claim to be for women or that are supposedly sex positive are churning out article titles such as “Ten lazy ways to lose weight” or “12 Little Things Every Guy Wants in Bed”. Their cover images are sexualised, their articles are derogatory and weight-obsessed, and their fashion editorials are so photoshopped that even the real life models no longer look like that. They evoke unneeded competition between women. And it isn’t just about body image, the models used, or size zero clothing. It’s about the stories and article written, the way celebrities are scrutinized, and what questions female actors and musicians are asked in their interviews. While there’s nothing wrong with wanting to be beautiful, desirable, sexy, or trendy, what is problematic is the obsession with these things about all else, to the point where being beautiful is seen as life’s greatest achievement and all else pales in comparison.
So we’ve decided to make a difference, in the form of a new magazine: Parallel. The title is a play on the idea that feminism and modern popular culture are currently running parallel to one another. In order to get feminism into the minds of the mainstream youth, the two things need to intersect and combine. And that’s exactly what we plan to do. Our magazine will cover subjects regarding race, gender, sexuality, age, liberation, women’s rights, activism, disability, and more, all tied up together in an aesthetically pleasing, contemporary women’s magazine. We will subvert the format of ordinary celebrity or fashion magazines to highlight key issues in today’s world. We will interview and talk to influential women about their opinions, highlight key feminist community groups that you could get involved in, and will review, discuss, and critique women’s role in the media.
Parallel Magazine will discuss achievements outside of fashion and beauty, will talk about community and activism and how women everywhere can make a change to the world around them. It will focus on everything from art to pop culture to history – all through the viewpoint of a modern young feminist.
whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because reactions to my females body related art has involved emails informing me that I am “inflicting self harm to my intellect” and “debasing my body.”
Do you see yourself reflected in the media you consume? Parallel Magazine is all about providing an alternative to the airbrushing and the shaming, the heteronormativity and the gender binary we’re dealt as the only way. Life through a feminist lens, by women for women. Support our start-up feminist magazine at 
http://bit.ly/parallelmag.
Women’s Magazines are several million pound industry in the UK. With over 200 titles to choose from, women buy on average almost 7 million magazines every month, and 38% of women in the UK trust magazines. And yet magazines that claim to be for women or that are supposedly sex positive are churning out article titles such as “Ten lazy ways to lose weight” or “12 Little Things Every Guy Wants in Bed”. Their cover images are sexualised, their articles are derogatory and weight-obsessed, and their fashion editorials are so photoshopped that even the real life models no longer look like that. They evoke unneeded competition between women. And it isn’t just about body image, the models used, or size zero clothing. It’s about the stories and article written, the way celebrities are scrutinized, and what questions female actors and musicians are asked in their interviews. While there’s nothing wrong with wanting to be beautiful, desirable, sexy, or trendy, what is problematic is the obsession with these things about all else, to the point where being beautiful is seen as life’s greatest achievement and all else pales in comparison.
So we’ve decided to make a difference, in the form of a new magazine: Parallel. The title is a play on the idea that feminism and modern popular culture are currently running parallel to one another. In order to get feminism into the minds of the mainstream youth, the two things need to intersect and combine. And that’s exactly what we plan to do. Our magazine will cover subjects regarding race, gender, sexuality, age, liberation, women’s rights, activism, disability, and more, all tied up together in an aesthetically pleasing, contemporary women’s magazine. We will subvert the format of ordinary celebrity or fashion magazines to highlight key issues in today’s world. We will interview and talk to influential women about their opinions, highlight key feminist community groups that you could get involved in, and will review, discuss, and critique women’s role in the media.
Parallel Magazine will discuss achievements outside of fashion and beauty, will talk about community and activism and how women everywhere can make a change to the world around them. It will focus on everything from art to pop culture to history – all through the viewpoint of a modern young feminist.

whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because reactions to my females body related art has involved emails informing me that I am “inflicting self harm to my intellect” and “debasing my body.”

Do you see yourself reflected in the media you consume? Parallel Magazine is all about providing an alternative to the airbrushing and the shaming, the heteronormativity and the gender binary we’re dealt as the only way. Life through a feminist lens, by women for women. Support our start-up feminist magazine at 

http://bit.ly/parallelmag.

Women’s Magazines are several million pound industry in the UK. With over 200 titles to choose from, women buy on average almost 7 million magazines every month, and 38% of women in the UK trust magazines. And yet magazines that claim to be for women or that are supposedly sex positive are churning out article titles such as “Ten lazy ways to lose weight” or “12 Little Things Every Guy Wants in Bed”. Their cover images are sexualised, their articles are derogatory and weight-obsessed, and their fashion editorials are so photoshopped that even the real life models no longer look like that. They evoke unneeded competition between women. And it isn’t just about body image, the models used, or size zero clothing. It’s about the stories and article written, the way celebrities are scrutinized, and what questions female actors and musicians are asked in their interviews. While there’s nothing wrong with wanting to be beautiful, desirable, sexy, or trendy, what is problematic is the obsession with these things about all else, to the point where being beautiful is seen as life’s greatest achievement and all else pales in comparison.

So we’ve decided to make a difference, in the form of a new magazine: Parallel. The title is a play on the idea that feminism and modern popular culture are currently running parallel to one another. In order to get feminism into the minds of the mainstream youth, the two things need to intersect and combine. And that’s exactly what we plan to do. Our magazine will cover subjects regarding race, gender, sexuality, age, liberation, women’s rights, activism, disability, and more, all tied up together in an aesthetically pleasing, contemporary women’s magazine. We will subvert the format of ordinary celebrity or fashion magazines to highlight key issues in today’s world. We will interview and talk to influential women about their opinions, highlight key feminist community groups that you could get involved in, and will review, discuss, and critique women’s role in the media.

Parallel Magazine will discuss achievements outside of fashion and beauty, will talk about community and activism and how women everywhere can make a change to the world around them. It will focus on everything from art to pop culture to history – all through the viewpoint of a modern young feminist.

(via unashamedlyfeminist)

i of the storm

a poem happened. early draft.

.

where do I end and the hurricane begin in its flow I am only a tube of cellulose around more flow our molecules mingle in and out of me

the good thing about cellulose is it is dissolvable very quickly wearing down the cavern of bones would take a lifetime but this is very quick

it’s just a certain sensation of edges vibrating to fast for the eye to follow how it gets here why it leaves and I am shod clod again I don’t know

cellulose escapism that’s what it is.

if I leave my body for the wind I leave money and snails and the sad self-conscious circus that he brands on my singing skin

it is a peepshow where I am spectator and spectacle covered in translucent layers while he gurns at me through opera glasses, the illustrious Master Everything

the hurricane is a way not to watch the shy body that is me the sunken eager eyes that are me and he the innuendo of identity is let fall chiffonly

I am permeable and impenetrable tension and release the ghost ball between my own hands a drop of water I can see right through blows glance off refracted

.

.

.

(C) Flo Reynolds, 2014. All rights reserved.

Writers and painters and stand-up comics and other creative types where solitude is so critical—these folks often think that the pair phenomenon is for others. But creative intimacy is so much more than “collaboration.” In writing especially, the problem of the hidden partner is rife. Most good editors don’t talk about what they do. It’s often indiscrete, or even disrespectful. I just heard the story of a magazine editor who lost his job because he’d lost the confidence of his writers by talking so promiscuously about how he rescued their work. Michael Pietsch, who edited David Foster Wallace, said that “The editor works in disappearing ink. If a writer takes a suggestion, it becomes part of her creation. If not, it never happened. The editor’s work is and always should be invisible.”

And some writers don’t even have an editor yet, or an agent, but many of the same functions of muse, critic, sounding board—these get played by members of writing workshops, spouses, special readers. (John McPhee calls them his “listeners.”)

paperswallow:

it’s not a party till you’re dragged from it by your friends while shouting “misogynists!”

(via salt-and-briar-roses)

bookpatrol:

Wolfman’s Books by kylejglenn on Flickr.

A Wild Vortex of Books Flying Right at You.

(via fuckyeahbookarts)

unashamedlyfeminist:

nephiesworld:

sundaegrrl:

lions-and-snails:

OH LOOK, A KICKSTARTER WHERE YOU CAN HELP FUND A FEMINIST MAGAZINE AND GET IT LAUNCHED.

When I was younger, I had an eating disorder and I used to buy women’s magazines because they encouraged me to hate myself. I remember reading once that women needed to shave or otherwise it was a totally legit reason for a man to leave them. It’s unhealthy and we desperately need a magazine that’s more women positive.

I’m really excited about this, and if you can pledge anything to make it happen, I really hope you do.

I’ve pledged £20 :)

I’ve pledged £20 too please back this if you can friends and signal boost it if you can’t <3

Also pledged £20 :3

Thank you!

unashamedlyfeminist:

I came across this graffito in Norwich the other day and it put a great big smile on my face. Respect to this unashamedly feminist artist!- Flo